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    The cockpit voice recorder and black box dimensions depend on the configuration and the aircraft type. The Smiths Industries flight data/cockpit voice recorder weighs 6.5 to 9.3 pounds (2.9 to 4.2 kilograms). It measures 3.4” H x 4.25” W x 7.5” D (8.6 cm x 10.8 cm x 19.0 cm). The black box is also known as the flight data recorder (FDR). 
     
    Why is it Called the Black Box?
     
    The box isn’t black; it is a fluorescent orange. That color is used so it is easier to locate. No one knows for sure why it is called the black box. But it probably stems from the fact that black is linked to death and accidents. 
     
    What is the Flight Data Recorder for? 
     
    The FDR is a device that stores all the information about the aircraft’s flight. It retrieves the data using several sensors. The aircraft’s speed, altitude and other information are all recorded. 
     
    Every time the aircraft takes flight, data about the flight is recorded. In the event of an accident, the black box may be able to provide important information for the investigators.
     
    The black box can survive in temperatures of up to 2,000 F. No matter the black box dimensions, it is almost always kept at the back of the plane. Research shows that the back is the part most likely to survive during a crash. 
     
    Cockpit Voice Recorder 
     
    As the name suggests, this device is used to record conversation between the pilot and other people in the cockpit. It is capable of recording several minutes of conversation. This is different from the flight data recorder. The FDR holds information about the flight. However, the term black box is applied to both. 
     
    How the Black Box Works
     
    The black box gathers data via the sensors scattered around the aircraft. The information is saved electronically. The data on this device will determine if the aircraft is working correctly. 
     
    Other information on the FDR includes the control wheel position, rudder position fuel flow and consumption, heading or direction and acceleration. 
     
    The black box also stores information about control and switch activation. In case of a crash, the black box can be used to recreate the entire flight up to the time of the crash. 
     
    Regardless of the black box dimensions, it can be used to determine the cause of the accident. Depending on the design, computerized flight simulations may be generated. This can be used to analyze what happened to the aircraft. 
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