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  • Biggest Horse

     

    Horses played a major role in the development of human culture and civilization. They gave Man his mobility, helped plow his fields and assisted him hunt for his food. Horse breeds are generally categorized into “cold blood,” such as draft horses which are suitable for slow and heavy work; “hot blood,” which are spirited animals that are built for endurance and speed; and, “warmblood,” which is a cross between cold and hot blood breeds developed for a particular riding purpose. Miniature horses, which measure less than three feet tall from whither to hoof, were also developed to serve as house pets or companion and service animals to assist people with disabilities. 

    The biggest horse breed is the Brabant, with stallions standing over 17 hands, or 68 inches tall and weighing over a ton, or 2,000 pounds. Throughout the years, this horse breed held world records for pulling ale wagons and are use up to the present for street cleaning, rubbish collection, leisure, forestry and promotional activities. During the Middle Ages, was called the Flanders Horse from which evolved the Shire and the English Great Horse. Noted for their capacity to pull very heavy weights, this ancient workhorse was developed to be taller and lighter in the United States while this biggest horse breed was bred to be heavier and thicker in Europe. Despite their huge size and strength, there is a streak of genetic disorder in the world’s biggest horse breed that makes them susceptible to a chronically progressive disease that is manifested through the swelling and fibrosis of distal limbs that usually end in euthanasia.

    The world record holder for being the biggest horse is a Brabant gelding called “Radar,” who was foaled in the United States. Standing at 78 inches from withers to hoof, Radar weighs more than a ton, or 1100 pounds. Radar is a picture of the perfect work animal with broad shoulders, heavily built quarters and body and a thick and powerful neck. Because of its huge size, Radar has an equally gigantic appetite and can consume up to 60 pounds of grains and hay and drink close to 20 gallons of water daily. Despite its colossal size, the biggest horse in the world is reputed to be a gentle, fun-loving equine that does no shy away from the glare of klieg lights and cameras to which it has been used to, having been featured numerous times in TV shows, promotional events and product endorsements. 

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